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Nakamise, Asakusa

nakamise

Nakamise (篁画??筝?) is one of the oldest shopping avenues in Japan.
After the Tokugawa Shogun settled in Edo (羆????, the former name of Tokyo), the population of Edo grew, and visitors to Sensoji temple (羌????絲?) increased.? Afterwards, neighbors of Sensoji were granted permission to set up shops on the approach to the temple.? This is the origin of Nakamise, and?it?is said that?this was?around 1688 to 1735.

Near Sensoji were cafes (though it is very different from the Western ones), and near Kaminarimon (??潔??), the entrance gate of Sensoji, were shops of toys, sweets, and souvenirs.

In?1885, the government of Tokyo ordered all shop owners to leave.? The area was reconstructed in Western-style brick in the same year. ?During the?Great Kanto earthquake in 1923, many of the red-brick shops were destroyed.??They were?rebuilt in 1925 using concrete, only to be destroyed again during the bombings of WW2.

nakamise

After the war, the people of Asakusa restored Nakamise, and in 1985, they celebrated the 100th anniversary of the modern Nakamise.? Illuminated signs were renovated, and the pavements were repaired.
In 1989, having Ikuo Hirayama, professor of Tokyo National University of Fine Arts and Music as editorial suprvisor, the shutters of Naakmise were painted with drawings of events in Asakusa.

The length of the street is approximately 250 meters and contains around 89 shops.? Take your time, and enjoy the shopping street and its history!


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Kappabashi Street Kitchen Town

kappabashi

Kappabashi is a street between Ueno and Asakusa, populated with shops supplying the?restaurant trade.? At the entrance of Kappabashi street by?Asakusa street is a giant cook mascot.
The shops sell everything from tableware, restaurant furniture, decorations, and stoves, most of them mass-produced.

The street’s name is believed to come from either the Kappa?(???臂?, raincoats) of nearby residents which were hang out to dry on the bridge, or from a merchant named Kihachi Kappaya?(???臂遵????????)?who funded the project to build Shinhorikawa River (??医??綏?, doesn’t exist today) for water management.
kappabashiHowever, due to the homophone with the popular mythical creature, Kappa (羃括?), the group of shops along the street officially adopted the creature Kappa as its mascot.? Images of the Kappa shown on the left?appear on shops along the street and web pages.

kappabashi kappabashi

One of the most popular and entertaining shops is Sample Shop Maizuru.? This is a shop of?plastic display food (sample foods),?found outside Japanese restaurants.? There are many real size sample foods, such as Sushi and cakes, and also miniature samples made into cell phone straps and magnets.? There are also unique interior goods like Sushi clocks!

kappabashi


Higherground Co.,Ltd.
2-8-3 Minami-Aoyama, Minato-ku, Tokyo, Japan
TEL:03-6459-2230
HP:http://www.higherground.co.jp/
TOP PAGE:?http://livingtokyo.net/

Chrysanthemum: Flower of Japan

Chrysanthemum is the national flower of Japan.??This flower?was already popular?in the 10th century, when many songs about chrysanthemum were made.? It became the Imperial flower in the 12th century, and it still is today.? You will see marks of chrysanthemum on many of the belongings to the Imperial family.

flower

Breed improvement was being made throughout the history of Japan.? To show the beauty and variety of chrysanthemum,?many exhibitions of chrysanthemum are held in autumn.
Below are some of the famous exhibitions.

Chrysanthemum of the Imperial Family
Location: Shinjuku Gyoen (??医?緇∴??)
Date: Nov.1-15

Asakusa Chrysanthemum Exhibition
Location: Asakusa
Date: Oct.15-Nov.15

Yasukuni Chrysanthemum Exhibition
Location: Yasukuni Shrine
Date: Oct.16-Nov.5


Higherground Co.,Ltd.
2-8-3 Minami-Aoyama, Minato-ku, Tokyo, Japan
TEL:03-6459-2230
HP:http://www.higherground.co.jp/
TOP PAGE:?http://livingtokyo.net/

Festival at Sensoji, Asakusa, Tokyo

Sensoji Temple (羌????絲?) is the oldest temple in Tokyo, always crowded with?worshippers and tourists.

sensoji

The birth of Sensoji was in A.D. 628, when the Hinokuma brothers found a pagod at the river.? The temple kept expanding throughout the Middle and Modern Ages, but the main hall, the five-story tower, and other facilities?were burnt down during WW2.
The temple was rebuilt during the 1950s-60s.? The rebuilding?united the behavers closer than ever, and afterwards, dance performances dedicated to the temple were started by local behavers.
These dances are still performed every November 3rd.? There will be dances of egret, gold dragon, and the Seven Gods.

sensoji

Sensoji Temple will be crowded than ever on this day, but?the beauty of the performance?is worth getting mobbed :)


Higherground Co.,Ltd.
2-8-3 Minami-Aoyama, Minato-ku, Tokyo, Japan
TEL:03-6459-2230
HP:http://www.higherground.co.jp/
TOP PAGE:?http://livingtokyo.net/

Sightseeing on Jinrikisha

jinrikisha

If you have been to Asakusa, Tokyo, you may have seen something like the photo above.
This is a Jinrikisha (篋阪??荵?), or sometimes called Rickshaw.? Jinrikisha literally means ‘human power vehicle’. The runner draw a two-wheeled cart (this cart is the Jinrikisha), which seats 1 or 2 persons.

Jinrikisha was mainly used for transportation until the early 20th century, but recently, it is solely used for sightseeing.??It is often seen in cities which still have the typical Japanese streetscape, such as Kyoto, Kamakura, and Asakusa.
The runner, called Shafu (荵?紊?, literally ‘vehicle man’), will often be your tour guide, as well as your driver.? While running through the historical streets, you will also obtain knowledge about the area.

jinrikisha

Jinrikisha in Asakusa are usually waiting for customers around the station or Sensoji Temple (羌????絲?).? It will cost about 10,000 yen for 2 people to go sightseeing around Asakusa.
Hop on the Jinrikisha, and feel the mood of the 19th century!


Higherground Co.,Ltd.
2-8-3 Minami-Aoyama, Minato-ku, Tokyo, Japan
TEL:03-6459-2230
HP:http://www.higherground.co.jp/
TOP PAGE:?http://livingtokyo.net/

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