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Kappabashi Street Kitchen Town

kappabashi

Kappabashi is a street between Ueno and Asakusa, populated with shops supplying the?restaurant trade.? At the entrance of Kappabashi street by?Asakusa street is a giant cook mascot.
The shops sell everything from tableware, restaurant furniture, decorations, and stoves, most of them mass-produced.

The street’s name is believed to come from either the Kappa?(???臂?, raincoats) of nearby residents which were hang out to dry on the bridge, or from a merchant named Kihachi Kappaya?(???臂遵????????)?who funded the project to build Shinhorikawa River (??医??綏?, doesn’t exist today) for water management.
kappabashiHowever, due to the homophone with the popular mythical creature, Kappa (羃括?), the group of shops along the street officially adopted the creature Kappa as its mascot.? Images of the Kappa shown on the left?appear on shops along the street and web pages.

kappabashi kappabashi

One of the most popular and entertaining shops is Sample Shop Maizuru.? This is a shop of?plastic display food (sample foods),?found outside Japanese restaurants.? There are many real size sample foods, such as Sushi and cakes, and also miniature samples made into cell phone straps and magnets.? There are also unique interior goods like Sushi clocks!

kappabashi


Higherground Co.,Ltd.
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TEL:03-6459-2230
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Ameyoko, Shop Street in Ueno

Ameyoko (??≪?≧┴) is a?shop street along the Yamanote line rails between Ueno and Okachimachi Station.? The 400m long street?consist of more than 400 stores.

ameyoko

Ameyoko is short for Ameya Yokocho (??≪?<?ゆ┴筝?).? There are several explanations?regarding this name.? One possible origin is that, because this street was a black market selling items disposed of by the US Army gathered here after WW2, this street came to be called Ame (short for America) - Ya (絮?, shop).? Another is that Ameya means Ame (蕋?, candy) - Ya (shop), and the street was named this because many candy stores are gathered here.
Any way, Ameya Yokocho is?usually called by its short term Ameyoko?today, and the sign of the streets also reads Ameyoko, as is in the photo above.

Today, various goods, such as food (mainly sea food and dried goods), clothings, and fashin items?are dealt in Ameyoko.??The number of sports equipment stores for youths increased in recent years.? On the basement floor of Ameyoko Center Building is a market of ethnic goods, where many of both the clerks and customers are Chinese.

ameyoko

In the photo above is the feature of Ameyoko, ‘Tatakiuri (????紕蚊??)’.? Tatakiuri is a?limited-time sale at a highly discounted price.? In the photo, a bag of chocolate is sold at 1000 Yen, and the shop will give you one more chocolate as a bonus.
Besides Tatakiuri, you can ask for a discount at many shops in Ameyoko.

ameyoko

Ameyoko changes its face in the?year’s end.? Many people visit Ameyoko for articles of food for celebrating the new year.? It is so crowded that it may even take an hour to walk through this 400m street!

Opening hours and closing days depend on individual stores, but most stores open around 10:00 and close around 19:00.? Many stores remain closed on selected Wednesdays.? Some stores change its handlings in the year’s end.


Higherground Co.,Ltd.
2-8-3 Minami-Aoyama, Minato-ku, Tokyo, Japan
TEL:03-6459-2230
HP:http://www.higherground.co.jp/
TOP PAGE:?http://livingtokyo.net/

Iwasaki Family House, Ueno, Tokyo

iwasaki

Within a few minutes walk from Ueno station, you will find a nice mansion and a garden.? This is Former Iwasaki Family House (??у鴬經????), which used to be the mansion of Iwasaki family, owner of Mitsubishi syndicate.

This family house was designed by Josiah Condor, an English architect, and was completed in 1896.? The basic tone is Jacobian style, but some Islamic taste is taken in.

iwasaki

The main building is western, but there is a Japanese style house in the back.? The rooms are beautiful, and there is a cafe space for having Japanese tea and sweets, which you can also enjoy in the garden.
Feel the history, culture, and nature? :)

Former Iwasaki Family House (??у鴬經????)
Location: Ueno
Open Hours: 9:00-17:00
Entrance Fee: 400JPY
Website: http://www.kensetsu.metro.tokyo.jp/kouen/kouenannai/park/english/kyu_iwasaki_tei.pdf (Eng)


Higherground Co.,Ltd.
2-8-3 Minami-Aoyama, Minato-ku, Tokyo, Japan
TEL:03-6459-2230
HP:http://www.higherground.co.jp/
TOP PAGE:?http://livingtokyo.net/

Yushima Tenmangu Shinto Shrine

yushima

Yushima Tenmangu (羚?涯紊???絎?)?is a Shinto Shrine near Ueno, commonly called Yushima Tenjin (羚?涯紊???).

This Shrine was originally established in 458 in order to worship Ameno-tajikaraono-mikoto (紊???????????????), one of deities appears in the Japanese myths. ?Later, in February 1355, the spirit of Sugawara Michizane (????????????, 845-903), a historical figure, was also enshrined to venerate his extraordinary virtue as a scholar.? Sugawara Michizane is enshrined as Tenjin (紊???), a god of thunder and storms.

yushima Portrait of Sugawara

In 1478, Ota Dokan(紊??育?????, 1432-86), a warlord in Kanto region,?rebuilt the Shrine.? Since then, many scholars and litterateurs including Confucianists such as Hayashi Razan (???臂?絮?, 1583-1657) and Arai Hakuseki (??遺????順??, 1657-1725)?in Edo period, have worshiped this shrine.

Nowadays many students visit this shrine to express their reverence to the enshrined spirit of Sugawara Michizane as?god of learning.? Especially in the season of school entrance examinations, young students visit to pray for the success of passing examinations.

yushima

The shrine is also famous for beautiful blossoms of Ume (罌?, Japanese apricot) in the precinct.? In February and March every year, Ume Matsuri (罌?腑???, Ume festival) is held, and it attracts many visitors who enjoy the Ume blossoms.? To the Japanese, Ume is?a special?flower that announces the arrival of spring, earlier than cherry blossoms.


Higherground Co.,Ltd.
2-8-3 Minami-Aoyama, Minato-ku, Tokyo, Japan
TEL:03-6459-2230
HP:http://www.higherground.co.jp/
TOP PAGE:?http://livingtokyo.net/

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